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Iconoclasts

From the Greek words eikon, meaning image, and klazo, I break. The name used to designate those in the Church, from the eighth century downward, who have been opposed to the use of sacred images, or, rather, to the paying of religious honor or reverence to such representations. Image worship prevailed extensively in the sixth and seventh centuries in the Eastern Empire. The iconoclast movement commenced with the Imperial Edict issued, in 726, by the Emperor Leo III, surnamed the Isaurian, who allowed images only of the Redeemer. The second decree was issued in 730. This was opposed strenuously by Popes Gregory II and III, but without avail.

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